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Mental Ilness Awareness Week 2011


People with a mental illness struggle with symptoms ranging from crushing depression and crippling anxiety to powerful delusions and hallucinations that force them to actively sort out the real from the imagined.

And if that weren't enough, they also have to deal with the way the rest of the world perceives their inner struggle.

Stigma associated with mental illness remains widespread in U.S. society, despite some progress made in demystifying these medical conditions, said Michael J. Fitzpatrick, executive director of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), which sponsors Mental Illness Awareness Week, Oct. 2-8, as part of its efforts.

"It's pervasive, but it's nuanced, too," Fitzpatrick said. "Most Americans understand that mental illnesses are treatable illnesses. I think people basically understand depression. Depression is talked about in the media and is considered a treatable disease. But when you reach psychosis and schizophrenia, there's still a lot of misunderstanding and fear."

As a result, people with a mental illness often feel isolated, afraid and rejected by society -- a stigma that causes many people to go without the treatment they need, said Dr. Garianne Gunter, an adult and child psychiatrist with the South Carolina Department of Mental Health.

Resources: Health Day

 

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Related Resources

The National Alliance on Mental Illness

Mental Illness Awareness Week

 

 

 

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