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Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Cam

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Coconut Oil

Uses

How It Works

How to Use It

The traditional diets of Pacific Islanders contains several grams per day or more of lauric acid from coconut products, which would require at least one tablespoon per day of coconut oil. Research has not established a recommended intake for coconut oil.

Coconut oil can also be used topically, as in the treatment of head lice .

Where to Find It

Coconut oil may be found in many types of processed foods, including fried foods, crackers, desserts, candies, whipped topping, and non-dairy creamers. It is also available in some grocery stores for use in cooking.

Possible Deficiencies

There is no human requirement for coconut oil or the shorter-length fatty acids it contains, so no deficiency is possible.

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

Serious allergic reactions to coconut or coconut oil have been reported but are considered rare.3 , 4 , 5

People using large amounts of coconut oil in their diet should have their blood cholesterol levels checked regularly.

References

1. Prior IA, Davidson F, Salmond CE, Czochanska Z. Cholesterol, coconuts, and diet on Polynesian atolls: a natural experiment: the Pukapuka and Tokelau island studies. Am J Clin Nutr 1981;34:1552–61.

2. Kaunitz H, Dayrit CS. Coconut oil consumption and coronary heart disease. Philippine J Intern Med 1992;30:165–71 [review].

3. Rosado A, Fernandez-Rivas M, Gonzalez-Mancebo E, et al. Anaphylaxis to coconut. Allergy 2002;57:182–3.

4. Teuber SS, Peterson WR. Systemic allergic reaction to coconut (Cocos nucifera) in 2 subjects with hypersensitivity to tree nut and demonstration of cross-reactivity to legumin-like seed storage proteins: new coconut and walnut food allergens. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1999;103:1180–5.

5. Couturier P, Basset-Stheme D, Navette N, Sainte-Laudy J. A case of coconut oil allergy in an infant: responsibility of "maternalized" infant formulas. Allerg Immunol (Paris) 1994;26:386–7 [in French].

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