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Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Cam

Search Health Information    Royal Jelly

Royal Jelly

Uses

Royal jelly is a thick, milky substance produced by worker bees to feed the queen bee. The worker bees mix honey and bee pollen with enzymes in the glands of their throats to produce royal jelly.

What Are Star Ratings?

Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

3 Stars Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.

2 Stars Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.

1 Star For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
2 Stars
High Cholesterol
50 to 100 mg daily
Supplementing with royal jelly may lower cholesterol levels.
Royal jelly has prevented the cholesterol-elevating effect of nicotine1 and has lowered serum cholesterol in animal studies.2 Preliminary human trials have also found that royal jelly may lower cholesterol levels.3 , 4 An analysis of cholesterol-lowering trials shows that 50 to 100 mg per day is the typical amount used in such research.5

How It Works

How to Use It

Royal jelly in the amount of 50–100 mg per day has been used in most of the studies on cholesterol lowering.

Where to Find It

Royal jelly is available in liquid form (usually in glass vials), tablets, and capsules.

Possible Deficiencies

Because royal jelly is not an essential nutrient, deficiencies do not occur.

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

Allergic reactions are the most common side effect. Allergic reactions from oral intake of royal jelly can range from very mild (e.g., mild gastrointestinal upset) to more severe reactions, including asthma , anaphylaxis (shock), intestinal bleeding, and even death in people who are extremely allergic to bee products.6 , 7 , 8 People who are allergic to bee pollen, honey, or conifer and poplar trees should not use royal jelly orally. Topical use of royal jelly has been reported to cause skin irritations in some people.9

References

1. Abou-Hozaifa BM, Badr El-Din NK. Royal jelly, a possible agent to reduce the nicotine-induced atherogenic lipoprotein profile. Saudi Med J 1995;16:337-42.

2. Abou-Hozaifa BM, Roston AAH, El-Nokaly FA. Effects of royal jelly and honey on serum lipids and lipoprotein cholesterol in rats fed cholesterol-enriched diet. J Biomed Sci Ther 1993;9:35-44.

3. Cho YT. Studies on royal jelly and abnormal cholesterol and triglycerides. Am Bee J 1977;117:36-9.

4. Liusov VA, Zimin IU. Experimental rational and trial of therapeutic use of bee raising product in cardiovascular diseases. Kardiologia 1983;23:105-9 [in Russian].

5. Vittek J. Effect of royal jelly on serum lipids in experimental animals and humans with atherosclerosis. Experientia 1995;51:927-35.

6. Thien FCK, Leung R, Baldo BA, et al. Asthma and anaphylaxis induced by royal jelly. Clin Exp Allergy 1996;26:216-22.

7. Leung R, Ho A, Chan J, et al. Royal jelly consumption and hypersensitivity in the community. Clin Exp Allergy 1997;27:333-6.

8. Yonei Y, Shibagaki K, Tsukada N, et al. Case report: haemorrhagic colitis associated with royal jelly intake. J Gastroenterol Hepatol 1997;12:495-9.

9. Takahashi M, Matsuo I, Ohkido M. Contact dermatitis due to honeybee royal jelly. Contact Dermatitis 1983;9:452-5.

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