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Search Health Information    Resveratrol

Resveratrol

Uses

Resveratrol, a compound found primarily in red wine, is a naturally occurring antioxidant .

What Are Star Ratings?

Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

3 Stars Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.

2 Stars Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.

1 Star For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
1 Star
Atherosclerosis
Refer to label instructions
Studies have found that red wine, which contains resveratrol, lowers risk of death from heart disease. Its antioxidant activity and effect on platelets leads some researchers believe that it is the protective agent in red wine.

Preliminary studies have found that people who drink red wine, which contains resveratrol , are at lower risk of death from heart disease. Because of its antioxidant activity and its effect on platelets, some researchers believe that resveratrol is the protective agent in red wine.1 , 2 , 3 Resveratrol research remains very preliminary, however, and as yet there is no evidence that the amounts found in supplements help prevent atherosclerosis in humans.

How It Works

How to Use It

An 8-ounce glass of red wine provides approximately 640 mcg of resveratrol, while a handful of peanuts provides about 73 mcg of resveratrol. Resveratrol supplements (often found in combination with grape extracts or other antioxidants ) are generally taken in the amount of 200–600 mcg per day. This is far less than the amount used in animal studies to prevent cancer: equivalent to more than 500 mg (500,000 mcg) per day for an average-sized human. Therefore, one should not assume that the small amounts found in supplements or food would necessarily be protective. The optimal level of intake is not known.

While a moderate intake of red wine may protect against heart disease , the optimal amount required to produce this effect is still unknown. Due to the risks involved with drinking alcohol, drinking red wine cannot be recommended as a means of preventing heart disease until more information is known.

Where to Find It

Resveratrol is present in a wide variety of plants—of the edible plants, mainly in grapes and peanuts.4 Wine is the primary dietary source of resveratrol. Red wine contains much greater amounts of resveratrol than does white wine, since resveratrol is concentrated in the grape skin and the manufacturing process of red wine includes prolonged contact with grape skins. Resveratrol is also available as a dietary supplement.

Possible Deficiencies

Since it is not an essential nutrient, resveratrol is not associated with a deficiency state.

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

At the time of writing, there were no well-known side effects caused by this supplement.

References

1. Bertelli AA, Giovanninni L, Bernini W, et al. Antiplatelet activity of cis-resveratrol. Drugs Exp Clin Res 1996;22(2):61-3.

2. Chen CK, Pace-Asciak. CR. Vasorelaxing activity of resveratrol and quercetin in isolated rat aorta. Gen Pharm 1996;27(2):363-6.

3. Pace-Asciak CR, Rounova O, Hahn SE, et al. Wines and grape juices as modulators of platelet aggregation in healthy human subjects. Clin Chim Acta 1996;246(1-2):163-82.

4. Soleas GJ, Diamandis EP, Goldberg DM. Resveratrol: A molecule whose time has come? And gone? Clin Biochem 1997;30:91-113.

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