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Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Cam

Search Health Information    Glutamic Acid

Glutamic Acid

Uses

How It Works

How to Use It

Healthy people do not need to take glutamic acid as a supplement; for those who do use this amino acid , appropriate amounts should be determined with the consultation of a physician.

Where to Find It

Sources of glutamic acid include high-protein foods, such as meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products. Some protein-rich plant foods also supply glutamic acid.

Possible Deficiencies

Most food sources of protein supply glutamic acid, so only a person deficient in protein would become deficient in glutamic acid.1

Interactions

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

As of the last update, we found no reported interactions between this supplement and medicines. It is possible that unknown interactions exist. If you take medication, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.
The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Side Effects

Glutamic acid is generally free of side effects for the vast majority of people who take it; however, people with kidney or liver disease should not consume high intakes of amino acids without consulting a healthcare professional. Because over stimulation of glutamate receptors is thought to be a possible cause of certain neurological diseases (e.g., amyotrophic lateral sclerosis [Lou Gehrig’s disease] and epilepsy ), people with a neurological disease should consult of physician before supplementing with glutamate.

References

1. Zello GA, Wykes LF, Ball RO, et al. Recent advances in methods of assessing dietary amino acid requirements for adult humans. J Nutr 1995;125:2907–15.

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