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Health Information

Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Cam

Search Health Information    Ginger

Ginger

Uses

Botanical names:
Zingiber officinale

Parts Used & Where Grown

Ginger is a perennial plant that grows in India, China, Mexico, and several other countries. The rhizome (underground stem) is used as both a spice and in herbal medicine.

What Are Star Ratings?

Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

3 Stars Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.

2 Stars Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.

1 Star For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Used for Why
3 Stars
Morning Sickness
1 gram powder daily
Learn More

Ginger is well-known for alleviating nausea and improving digestion. One gram of encapsulated ginger powder was used in one study to reduce the severe nausea and vomiting associated with hyperemesis gravidarum.1 This condition is potentially life-threatening and should only be treated by a qualified healthcare professional. A review of six double-blind trials concluded that ginger is probably an effective treatment for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy.2

Because ginger contains some compounds that cause chromosomal mutation in the test tube, some doctors are concerned about the safety of using ginger during pregnancy . However, the available clinical research, combined with the fact that ginger is widely used in the diets of many cultures, suggests that prudent use of ginger for morning sickness is probably safe in amounts up to 1 gram per day.3

3 Stars
Motion Sickness
Adults: 500 mg one hour before travel and then 500 mg every two to four hours as necessary; children: 250 mg (half dose)
Learn More

Ginger may be useful for the prevention and treatment of mild to moderate cases of motion sickness. A double-blind trial examined the effects of ginger supplements in people who were susceptible to motion sickness. Researchers found that those taking 940 mg of powdered ginger in capsules experienced less motion sickness than those who took dimenhydrinate (Dramamine).4 Another double-blind trial reported that 1 gram of powdered ginger root, compared with placebo, lessened seasickness by 38% and vomiting by 72% in a group of naval cadets sailing in heavy seas.5 Two clinical trials, one with adults and one with children, found that ginger was as effective in treating seasickness as dimenhydrinate but with fewer side effects.6 , 7 In one controlled trial, though, neither powdered ginger (500 to 1,000 mg) nor fresh ginger (1,000 mg) provided any protection against motion sickness.8 Doctors prescribing ginger for motion sickness recommend 500 mg one hour before travel and then 500 mg every two to four hours as necessary. The study with children used one-half the adult amount.

Ginger’s beneficial effect on motion sickness appears to be related to its action on the gastrointestinal tract rather than on the central nervous system.9 , 10

3 Stars
Osteoarthritis
510 mg daily of a concentrated herbal extract, taken in divided doses
Learn More
Ginger has historically been used for arthritis and rheumatism. A preliminary trial reported relief in pain and swelling among people with arthritis who used powdered ginger supplements11 More recently, a double-blind trial found ginger extract (170 mg three times a day for three weeks) to be slightly more effective than placebo at relieving pain in people with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee.12 In another double-blind study, a concentrated extract of ginger, taken in the amount of 255 mg twice daily for six weeks, was significantly more effective than a placebo, as determined by the degree of pain relief and overall improvement.13
2 Stars
Epilepsy (Asian Ginseng, Bupleurum, Cassia Bark, Chinese Scullcap, Jujube, Licorice, Peony, Pinellia)
2.5 grams a day of sho-saiko-to or saiko-keishi-to in tea or capsules
Learn More

The Chinese herb bupleurum is included in two similar Chinese herbal formulae known as sho-saiko-to and saiko-keishi-to; these combinations contain the same herbs but in different proportions. The other ingredients are peony root, pinellia root, cassia bark, ginger root, jujube fruit, Asian ginseng root, Asian scullcap root, and licorice root. Both formulas have been shown in preliminary trials to be helpful for people with epilepsy.14 , 15 , 16 No negative interactions with a variety of anticonvulsant drugs were noted in these trials. The usual amount taken of these formulas is 2.5 grams three times per day as capsules or tea. People with epilepsy should not use either formula without first consulting with a healthcare professional.

2 Stars
Hepatitis (Asian Ginseng, Bupleurum, Cassia Bark, Chinese Scullcap, Jujube, Licorice, Peony, Pinellia)
Take 2.5 grams of sho-saiko-to three times per day
Learn More

Preliminary trials have shown that the bupleurum -containing formula sho-saiko-to can help reduce symptoms and blood liver enzyme levels in children and adults with chronic active viral hepatitis.17 , 18 , 19 , 20 Most of theses trials were in people with hepatitis B infection, though one preliminary trial has also shown a benefit in people with hepatitis C.21 Sho-saiko-to was also found, in a large preliminary trial to decrease the risk of people with chronic viral hepatitis developing liver cancer. However, people who had a sign of recent hepatitis B infection were not as strongly protected in this trial.22 The usual amount of sho-saiko-to used is 2.5 grams three times daily. Sho-saiko-to should not be used together with interferon drug therapy as it may increase risk of pneumonitis - a potentially dangerous inflammation in the lungs.23

2 Stars
Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
2 to 4 grams daily fresh ginger or equivalent for indigestion
Learn More

Carminatives (also called aromatic digestive tonics or aromatic bitters) may be used to relieve symptoms of indigestion, particularly when there is excessive gas. It is believed that carminative agents work, at least in part, by relieving spasms in the intestinal tract.24

There are numerous carminative herbs, including European angelica root (Angelica archangelica), anise , Basil , cardamom, cinnamon , cloves, coriander, dill, ginger , oregano , rosemary , sage , lavender , and thyme .25 Many of these are common kitchen herbs and thus are readily available for making tea to calm an upset stomach. Rosemary is sometimes used to treat indigestion in the elderly by European herbal practitioners.26 The German Commission E monograph suggests a daily intake of 4–6 grams of sage leaf.27 Pennyroyal is no longer recommended for use in people with indigestion, however, due to potential side effects.

Demulcents herbs may be used to treat indigestion and heartburn. These herbs seem to work by decreasing inflammation and forming a physical barrier against stomach acid or other abdominal irritants. Examples of demulcent herbs include ginger , licorice , and slippery elm .

Ginger is a spice well known for its traditional use as a treatment for a variety of gastrointestinal complaints, ranging from flatulence to ulcers. Ginger has anti-inflammatory and anti-nausea properties. Ginger has been shown to enhance normal, spontaneous movements of the intestines that aid digestion.28

2 Stars
Liver Cirrhosis (Asian Ginseng, Bupleurum, Cassia Bark, Chinese Scullcap, Jujube, Licorice, Peony, Pinellia)
2.5 grams of the Chinese herbal formula sho-saiko-to three times daily
Learn More

The Chinese herb bupleurum is an important component of the formula known as sho-saiko-to. Sho-saiko-to was shown in one preliminary trial to reduce the risk of liver cancer in people with liver cirrhosis.29 The amount of this formula used was 2.5 grams three times daily.

2 Stars
Pre- and Post-Surgery Health
1 gram of powder in a capsule 60 minutes before receiving general anesthesia (inform your anesthesiologist)
Learn More

A recent study found that 24% of surgery patients had taken herbal supplements before their surgeries, and 50 different herbs had been used among these patients.30 Little research exists, however, on the safety or efficacy of herbs before surgery. Some researchers and healthcare providers are concerned about possible harmful interactions between herbs and medications used around or during surgery, or the possibility that some herbs may increase bleeding during and after surgery.31 , 32 The use of herbs around the time of surgery should be discussed with a knowledgeable healthcare practitioner.

Nausea and vomiting can be experienced post-operatively as a result of anesthesia. Ginger  (Zingiber officinale) has antinausea properties and has been examined for its ability to prevent post-operative nausea and vomiting in several controlled trials. In two of these controlled trials, ginger was found more effective than placebo and equal to an antinausea medication;33 , 34 however, in two other controlled trials ginger was not found to have any benefit.35 , 36 A review considering the results of these trials concluded that 1 gram of ginger taken before surgery prevents nausea and vomiting slightly better than placebo, but this difference is not significant.37 However, a more recent review concluded that ginger is an effective means for reducing postoperative nausea and vomiting.38

2 Stars
Vertigo
1 gram of powdered root daily
Learn More

One gram of powdered ginger  (Zingiber officinale) root in a single application has been reported to significantly reduce symptoms of artificially induced vertigo in one double-blind trial.39 In a double-blind trial, 1 gram of powdered ginger root was found to have very little effect in reducing vertigo related to seasickness .40

1 Star
Atherosclerosis
Refer to label instructions
Learn More

The research on ginger ’s ability to reduce platelet stickiness indicates that 10 grams (approximately 1 heaping teaspoon) per day is the minimum necessary amount to be effective.41 Lower amounts of dry ginger,42 as well as various levels of fresh ginger,43 have not been shown to affect platelets.

1 Star
Dysmenorrhea
250 mg four times per day, beginning at the start of menstruation and continuing for three days
Learn More

Ginger has been used in some systems of traditional medicine to treat dysmenorrhea. In a double-blind trial, ginger powder was as effective as anti-inflammatory medication (mefenamic acid and ibuprofen) in relieving symptoms of dysmenorrhea. Ginger was used in the amount of 250 mg four times per day, beginning at the start of menstruation and continuing for three days.44

1 Star
Hay Fever (Asiasarum Root, Cassia Bark, Licorice, Ma Huang, Peony, Pinellia, Schisandra)
Refer to label instructions
Learn More

The Japanese herbal formula known as sho-seiryu-to has been shown to reduce symptom, such as sneezing, for people with hay fever.45 Sho-seiryu-to contains licorice , cassia bark, schisandra , ma huang, ginger , peony root , pinellia, and asiasarum root.

1 Star
HIV and AIDS Support (Asian Ginseng, Bupleurum, Cassia Bark, Chinese Scullcap, Jujube, Licorice, Peony, Pinellia)
Refer to label instructions
Learn More

The Chinese herb bupleurum , as part of the herbal formula sho-saiko-to, has been shown to have beneficial immune effects on white blood cells taken from people infected with HIV.46 Sho-saiko-to has also been shown to improve the efficacy of the anti-HIV drug lamivudine in the test tube.47 One preliminary study found that 7 of 13 people with HIV given sho-saiko-to had improvements in immune function.48 Double-blind trials are needed to determine whether bupleurum or sho-saiko-to might benefit people with HIV infection or AIDS. Other herbs in sho-saiko-to have also been shown to have anti-HIV activity in the test tube, most notably Asian scullcap .49 Therefore studies on sho-saiko-to cannot be taken to mean that bupleurum is the only active herb involved. The other ingredients are peony root, pinellia root, cassia bark, ginger root, jujube fruit, Asian ginseng root, Asian scullcap root, and licorice root.

1 Star
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (Bupleurum, Dan Shen, Schisandra, Wormwood)
Take a Chinese herbal formula containing wormwood under the guidance of a qualified practitioner
Learn More

Whole peppermint leaf is often used either alone or in combination with other herbs to treat abdominal discomfort and mild cramping that accompany IBS. The combination of peppermint, caraway seeds, fennel seeds, and wormwood was reported to be an effective treatment for upper abdominal complaints in a double-blind trial.50

1 Star
Low Back Pain
Refer to label instructions
Learn More

Herbalists often use ginger to decrease inflammation and the pain associated with it, including for those with low back pain. They typically suggest 1.5 to 3 ml of ginger tincture three times per day, or 2 to 4 grams of the dried root powder two to three times per day. Some products contain a combination of curcumin and ginger. However, no research has investigated the effects of these herbs on low back pain.

1 Star
Migraine Headache
Refer to label instructions
Learn More
Anecdotal evidence suggests ginger may be used for migraines and the accompanying nausea. In a double-blind study, a sublingual preparation that contained both feverfew and ginger LipiGesic M (PuraMed BioScience, Inc., Schofield, WI) appeared to be beneficial for acute migraines.51
1 Star
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Refer to label instructions
Learn More

Ginger is another Ayurvedic herb used to treat people with arthritis. A small number of case studies suggest that taking 6–50 grams of fresh or powdered ginger per day may reduce the symptoms of RA.52 A combination formula containing ginger, turmeric, boswellia, and ashwagandha has been shown in a double-blind trial to be slightly more effective than placebo for RA;53 the amounts of herbs used in this trial are not provided by the investigators.

Traditional Use (May Not Be Supported by Scientific Studies)

Traditional Chinese Medicine has recommended ginger for over 2,500 years. It is used for abdominal bloating, coughing , vomiting, diarrhea , and rheumatism. Ginger is commonly used in the Ayurvedic and Tibb systems of medicine for the treatment of inflammatory joint diseases, such as arthritis and rheumatism.

How It Works

Botanical names:
Zingiber officinale

How It Works

The dried rhizome of ginger contains approximately 1–4% volatile oils. These are the medically active constituents of ginger and are also responsible for ginger’s characteristic odor and taste. The aromatic constituents include zingiberene and bisabolene, while the pungent constituents are known as gingerols and shogaols.54 The pungent constituents are credited with the anti-nausea and anti-vomiting effects of ginger.

In humans, ginger is thought to act directly on the gastrointestinal system to reduce nausea.55 Ginger has been shown to reduce the symptoms of motion sickness associated with travel by boat and, to a lesser extent, car.56 , 57 , 58 Two double-blind clinical trials have found that ginger may reduce nausea due to anesthesia following surgery,59 , 60 although one trial could not confirm this benefit.61 A preliminary trial has suggested ginger may be helpful for preventing chemotherapy -induced nausea. 62

While ginger is a popular remedy for nausea of pregnancy , it has only been clinically studied for very severe nausea and vomiting known as hyperemesis gravidarum.63 This condition is life threatening and should only be treated by a qualified healthcare professional. Because ginger contains some compounds that cause chromosomal mutation in the test tube, some doctors are concerned about the safety of using ginger during pregnancy. However, the available clinical research, combined with the fact that ginger is widely used in the diet of certain cultures, suggests that prudent use of ginger for morning sickness is safe in amounts up to 1 gram per day.

Ginger is considered a tonic for the digestive tract, stimulating digestion and toning the intestinal muscles.64 This action eases the transport of substances through the digestive tract, lessening irritation to the intestinal walls.65 Ginger may protect the stomach from the damaging effect of alcohol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen ) and may help prevent ulcers .66

Ginger also supports cardiovascular health . Ginger may make blood platelets less sticky and less likely to aggregate.67 , 68 However, not all human research has confirmed this.69 , 70

How to Use It

For prevention or treatment of motion sickness, 500 mg of dried ginger powder can be taken one-half to one hour before travel, and then 500 mg every two to four hours as necessary. Children below the age of six should use one-half the adult amount. For the treatment of nausea associated with pregnancy , women can take up to 1 gram daily,71 but should only use ginger for symptomatic relief of nausea and not on an ongoing basis. Ginger may potentially be used for nausea associated with anesthesia or chemotherapy, but only under the supervision of a physician.

Interactions

Botanical names:
Zingiber officinale

Interactions with Supplements, Foods, & Other Compounds

At the time of writing, there were no well-known supplement or food interactions with this supplement.

Interactions with Medicines

Certain medicines interact with this supplement.

Types of interactions: Beneficial Adverse Check

Replenish Depleted Nutrients

  • none

Reduce Side Effects

  • Bicalutamide

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.72 , 73 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

  • Busulfan

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.74 , 75 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Capecitabine

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.76 , 77 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

  • Carboplatin

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.78 , 79 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Carmustine

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.80 , 81 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Chlorambucil

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.82 , 83 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Cisplatin

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.84 , 85 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

  • Cladribine

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.86 , 87 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

  • Cyclophosphamide

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.88 , 89 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Cytarabine

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.90 , 91 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

  • Desflurane

    General anesthetics commonly cause nausea upon waking. In a double-blind study, taking 1 gram of ginger (Zingiber officinale) one hour before surgery was as effective at reducing nausea and vomiting as the anti-nausea drug metoclopramide .92 Individuals taking ginger in order to avoid side effects should disclose this to their doctor prior to surgery, since the herb might affect blood clotting.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Docetaxel

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.93 , 94 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Enflurane

    General anesthetics commonly cause nausea upon waking. In a double-blind study, taking 1 gram of ginger (Zingiber officinale) one hour before surgery was as effective at reducing nausea and vomiting as the anti-nausea drug metoclopramide .95 Individuals taking ginger in order to avoid side effects should disclose this to their doctor prior to surgery, since the herb might affect blood clotting.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Erlotinib

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.96 , 97 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

  • Etomidate

    General anesthetics commonly cause nausea upon waking. In a double-blind study, taking 1 gram of ginger (Zingiber officinale) one hour before surgery was as effective at reducing nausea and vomiting as the anti-nausea drug metoclopramide .98 Individuals taking ginger in order to avoid side effects should disclose this to their doctor prior to surgery, since the herb might affect blood clotting.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Etoposide

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.99 , 100 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

  • Floxuridine

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.101 , 102 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

  • Fludarabine

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.103 , 104 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

  • Fluorouracil

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.105 , 106 Ginger powder in tablets or capsules can be taken for nausea, in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Halothane

    General anesthetics commonly cause nausea upon waking. In a double-blind study, taking 1 gram of ginger (Zingiber officinale) one hour before surgery was as effective at reducing nausea and vomiting as the anti-nausea drug metoclopramide .107 Individuals taking ginger in order to avoid side effects should disclose this to their doctor prior to surgery, since the herb might affect blood clotting.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Hydroxyurea

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.108 , 109 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

  • Ifosfamide

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.110 , 111 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Irinotecan

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.112 , 113 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

  • Isoflurane

    General anesthetics commonly cause nausea upon waking. In a double-blind study, taking 1 gram of ginger (Zingiber officinale) one hour before surgery was as effective at reducing nausea and vomiting as the anti-nausea drug metoclopramide .114 Individuals taking ginger in order to avoid side effects should disclose this to their doctor prior to surgery, since the herb might affect blood clotting.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Ketamine

    General anesthetics commonly cause nausea upon waking. In a double-blind study, taking 1 gram of ginger (Zingiber officinale) one hour before surgery was as effective at reducing nausea and vomiting as the anti-nausea drug metoclopramide .115 Individuals taking ginger in order to avoid side effects should disclose this to their doctor prior to surgery, since the herb might affect blood clotting.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Lomustine

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.116 , 117 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Mechlorethamine

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.118 , 119 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Melphalan

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.120 , 121 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Mercaptopurine

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.122 , 123 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

  • Methotrexate

    Ginger can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.124 , 125 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Methoxyflurane

    General anesthetics commonly cause nausea upon waking. In a double-blind study, taking 1 gram of ginger (Zingiber officinale) one hour before surgery was as effective at reducing nausea and vomiting as the anti-nausea drug metoclopramide .126 Individuals taking ginger in order to avoid side effects should disclose this to their doctor prior to surgery, since the herb might affect blood clotting.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Nitric Oxide Gas

    General anesthetics commonly cause nausea upon waking. In a double-blind study, taking 1 gram of ginger (Zingiber officinale) one hour before surgery was as effective at reducing nausea and vomiting as the anti-nausea drug metoclopramide .127 Individuals taking ginger in order to avoid side effects should disclose this to their doctor prior to surgery, since the herb might affect blood clotting.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Paclitaxel
    Ginger can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.128 , 129 Tablets or capsules containing powdered ginger can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, as needed.
    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Polifeprosan 20 with Carmustine

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.130 , 131 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Propofol

    General anesthetics commonly cause nausea upon waking. In a double-blind study, taking 1 gram of ginger (Zingiber officinale) one hour before surgery was as effective at reducing nausea and vomiting as the anti-nausea drug metoclopramide .132 Individuals taking ginger in order to avoid side effects should disclose this to their doctor prior to surgery, since the herb might affect blood clotting.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Sevoflurane

    General anesthetics commonly cause nausea upon waking. In a double-blind study, taking 1 gram of ginger (Zingiber officinale) one hour before surgery was as effective at reducing nausea and vomiting as the anti-nausea drug metoclopramide .133 Individuals taking ginger in order to avoid side effects should disclose this to their doctor prior to surgery, since the herb might affect blood clotting.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Thioguanine

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.134 , 135 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

  • Thiotepa

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.136 , 137 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Uracil Mustard

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.138 , 139 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Vinblastine

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.140 , 141 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

  • Vincristine

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale) can be helpful in alleviating nausea and vomiting caused by chemotherapy.142 , 143 Ginger, as tablets, capsules, or liquid herbal extracts, can be taken in 500 mg amounts every two or three hours, for a total of 1 gram per day.

Support Medicine

  • none

Reduces Effectiveness

  • none

Potential Negative Interaction

  • Heparin

    Ginger has been shown to reduce platelet stickiness in test tubes. Although there are no reports of interactions with anticoagulant drugs, people should consult a healthcare professional if they are taking an anticoagulant and wish to use ginger.144

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.
  • Warfarin

    Ginger has been shown to reduce platelet stickiness in test tubes. Although there are no reports of interactions with anticoagulant drugs, people should consult a healthcare professional if they are taking an anticoagulant and wish to use ginger.145

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.

Explanation Required

  • Ticlopidine

    Ginger has been shown to reduce platelet stickiness in test tubes. Although there appear to be no reports of interactions with platelet inhibiting drugs, people should talk with a healthcare professional if they are taking a platelet inhibitor and wish to use ginger.146

The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

Side Effects

Botanical names:
Zingiber officinale

Side Effects

Side effects due to ginger are rare when used as recommended. However, some people sensitive to the taste may experience heartburn . People with a history of gallstones should consult a doctor before using ginger.147 Short-term use of ginger for nausea and vomiting during pregnancy appears to pose no safety problems. However, long-term use during pregnancy is not recommended. A doctor should be informed if ginger is used before surgery as the herb may increase bleeding.

References

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40. Grontved A, Brask T, Kambskard J, Hentzer E. Ginger root against sea sickness. A controlled trial in the open sea. Acta Otolarygol 1988;105:45–9.

41. Bordia A, Verma SK, Srivastava KC. Effect of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc) and fenugreek (Trigonella foenumgraceum L) on blood lipids, blood sugar, and platelet aggregation in patients with coronary artery disease. Prostagland Leukotrienes Essential Fatty Acids 1997;56:379–84.

42. Lumb AB. Effect of dried ginger on human platelet function. Thromb Haemost 1994;7:110–1.

43. Janssen PL, Meyboom S, van Staveren WA, et al. Consumption of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) does not affect ex vivo platelet thromboxane production in humans. Eur J Clin Nutr 1996;50:772–4.

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52. Srivastava KC, Mustafa T. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) in rheumatism and musculoskeletal disorders. Med Hypoth 1992;39:342–8.

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55. Holtmann S, Clarke AH, Scherer H, Hohn M. The anti-motion sickness mechanism of ginger. A comparative study with placebo and dimenhydrinate. Acta Otolaryngol (Stockh) 1989;108:168–74.

56. Grontved A, Brask T, Kambskard J, Hentzer E. Ginger root against seasickness. Acta Otolaryngol 1988;105:45–9.

57. Ribenfeld D, Borzone L. Randomized double-blind study comparing ginger (Zintona®) with dimenhydrinate in motion sickness. Healthnotes Rev Complementary Integrative Med 1999;6:98–101.

58. Careddu P. Motion sickness in children: Results of a double-blind study with ginger (Zintona®) and dimenhydrinate. Healthnotes Rev Complementary Integrative Med 1999;6:102–7.

59. Bone ME, Wilkinson DJ, Young JR, et al. Ginger root—a new antiemetic: The effect of ginger root on postoperative nausea and vomiting after major gynaecological surgery. Anaesthesia 1990;45:669–71.

60. Phillips S, Ruggier R, Hutchingson SE. Zingiber officinale (ginger)—an antiemetic for day case surgery. Anaesthesia 1993;48:715–7.

61. Arfeen Z, Owen H, Plummer JL, et al. A double-blind randomized controlled trial of ginger for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting. Anaesthesia 1995;23:449–52

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67. Bordia A, Verma SK, Srivastava KC. Effect of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc) and fenugreek (Trigonella foenumgraecum L) on blood lipids, blood sugar, and platelet aggregation in patients with coronary artery disease. Prostagland Leukotrienes Essential Fatty Acids 1997;56:379–84.

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