Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+)
Print    Email
Bookmark and Share

Health Information

Health Information

Health Information

Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Cam

Search Health Information    Ketorolac

Topic Contents

Ketorolac

Drug Information

Ketorolac is used orally to treat moderately severe acute pain (e.g., migraine headaches ), but should not be used for more than five days. It is also used in the eye to treat itching due to seasonal allergies and to prevent inflammation following cataract surgery.

Common brand names:

Acular, Acular LS, Toradol, Acular PF

Summary of Interactions with Vitamins, Herbs, & Foods

Types of interactions: Beneficial Adverse Check

Replenish Depleted Nutrients

  • none

Reduce Side Effects

  • none

Support Medicine

  • none

Reduces Effectiveness

  • High-Fat

    Taking ketorolac with a high-fat breakfast slows the speed of drug absorption by about an hour, but it does not affect overall blood levels of the drug.1 To lessen stomach upset, ketorolac tablets should be taken with a meal or a snack.

Potential Negative Interaction

  • Potassium

    A 50-year-old male developed high blood levels of potassium following eight days of ketorolac treatment.3 Additional research is needed to determine whether taking ketorolac together with supplemental potassium might enhance this side effect. individuals taking oral ketorolac should probably avoid potassium supplements and salt substitutes until more information is available.

  • White Willow

    White willow bark (Salix alba) contains salicin, which is related to aspirin . Both salicin and aspirin produce anti-inflammatory effects after they have been converted to salicylic acid in the body. The administration of salicylates like aspirin to individuals taking oral NSAIDs may result in reduced blood levels of NSAIDs.4 Though no studies have investigated interactions between white willow bark and NSAIDs, people taking NSAIDs should avoid the herb until more information is available.

    The interaction is supported by preliminary, weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence.

Explanation Required 

  • none

The Drug-Nutrient Interactions table may not include every possible interaction. Taking medicines with meals, on an empty stomach, or with alcohol may influence their effects. For details, refer to the manufacturers’ package information as these are not covered in this table. If you take medications, always discuss the potential risks and benefits of adding a new supplement with your doctor or pharmacist.

References

1. Mroszczak EJ, Jung D, Yee J, et al. Ketorolac tromethamine pharmacokinetics and metabolism after intravenous, intramuscular, and oral administration in humans and animals. Pharmacotherapy 1990;10:33S-9S.

2. Mroszczak EJ, Jung D, Yee J, et al. Ketorolac tromethamine pharmacokinetics and metabolism after intravenous, intramuscular, and oral administration in humans and animals. Pharmacotherapy 1990;10:33S-9S.

3. Kelley M, Bastani B. Ketorolac-induced acute renal failure and hyperkalemia. Clin Nephrol 1995;44:276-7 [letter].

4. Olin BR, ed. Central Nervous System Drugs, Analgesics and Anti-inflammatory Drugs, Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Agents, In Drug Facts and Comparisons. St. Louis, MO: Facts and Comparisons, 1993, 1172-90.

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise, Incorporated disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use. How this information was developed to help you make better health decisions.

Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.

© 2014 St. Mary's Health System   |  3700 Washington Avenue  |  Evansville, IN 47750  |  (812) 485-4000