Decrease (-) Restore Default Increase (+)
Print    Email
Bookmark and Share

Health Information

Health Information

Health Information

Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Cam

Search Health Information    Hay Fever (Holistic)

Hay Fever (Holistic)

About This Condition

Sniffling, sneezing, and wheezing? It must be pollen season. If you suffer from hay fever, you can find relief through a number of treatments. According to research or other evidence, the following self-care steps may be helpful.
  • Try butterbur

    To help with symptoms, take an herbal extract standardized to contain 8 mg of petasin per tablet two or three times a day for two weeks

  • Get relief with nettle leaf

    Ease symptoms by taking 450 mg of nettle leaf capsules or tablets two to three times a day

  • Take an allergy test

    Make an appointment with your healthcare provider or an allergist to find out what airborne agents you may be allergic to and how you can reduce their effects

About

About This Condition

Hay fever is an allergic condition triggered by the immune system’s response to inhalant substances (frequently pollens).

Researchers have yet to clearly understand why some people’s immune systems over-react to exposure to pollens while other people do not suffer from this problem. Symptoms of hay fever are partly a result of inflammation that, in turn, is activated by the immune system.

Symptoms

Inhaled allergens trigger sneezing and inflammation of the nose and mucous membranes (conjunctiva) of the eyes. The nose, roof of the mouth, eyes, and throat begin to itch gradually or abruptly after the onset of the pollen season. Tearing, sneezing, and clear, watery nasal discharge soon follow the itching. Headaches and irritability may also occur.

Eating Right

The right diet is the key to managing many diseases and to improving general quality of life. For this condition, scientific research has found benefit in the following healthy eating tips.

Recommendation Why
Go on a low-allergen diet
Work with a knowledgeable health professional to find out if dropping certain foods from your diet will help your hay fever.

People with inhalant allergies are likely to also have food allergies .1 , 2 A hypoallergenic diet has been reported to help some people with asthma and allergic rhinitis,3 but the effect of such a diet on hay fever symptoms has not been studied. Hay fever sufferers interested in exploring the possible effects of a food allergy avoidance program should talk with a doctor. Discovering and eliminating offending food allergens, should they exist, is likely to improve overall health even if such an approach has no effect on hay fever symptoms.

Supplements

What Are Star Ratings?

Our proprietary “Star-Rating” system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by some in the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

3 Stars Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.

2 Stars Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.

1 Star For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Supplement Why
3 Stars
Butterbur
1 tablet standardized to contain 8 mg petasin extract two to three times a day for two weeks
Studies have shown butterbur extract to be effective at reducing hay fever symptoms.

Two double-blind studies have compared butterbur extract to standard antihistamine drugs in people with hay fever. The first compared it with the drug cetirizine (Zyrtec) and found the drug and butterbur extract relieved symptoms equally well. However, cetirizine caused significantly more adverse effects, including a high rate of drowsiness.4 The second study compared butterbur extract with fexofenadine (Allegra) and placebo. Butterbur extract was as effective as fexofenadine at relieving symptoms, and both were significantly better than placebo.5

People with hay fever had better symptomatic relief and reductions in levels of immune cells associated with allergic reactions (eosinophils) when treated with an herbal formula containing horny goat weed compared with a formula without horny goat weed and another herb by itself.6 Traditionally 5 grams (1 tsp) of horny goat weed is taken three times per day, usually after being simmered (decocted) in 250 ml (1 pint) of water for 10 to 15 minutes.7

In a double-blind study, an extract of the butterbur plant (Petasites hybridus) was significantly more effective than a placebo at improving symptoms in people suffering from seasonal allergic rhinitis.8 The study used a preparation standardized to contain 8 mg of total petasin per tablet. One tablet was administered either two or three times a day for two weeks; the larger amount was found to be more effective than the smaller amount.

2 Stars
Guduchi
300 mg of a standardized extract three times a day
In one trial, an extract of Tinospora cordifolia effectively relieved symptoms of allergic rhinitis, including sneezing, runny nose, nasal obstruction, and nasal itching.

Tinospora cordifolia is an herb used in traditional Indian ( Ayurvedic ) medicine for increasing longevity, promoting intelligence, and improving memory and immune function. In a double-blind trial, an extract of Tinospora cordifolia was significantly more effective than a placebo at relieving symptoms of allergic rhinitis, including sneezing, runny nose, nasal obstruction, and nasal itching. The study used 300 mg of a standardized extract three times a day for eight weeks.9

2 Stars
Horny Goat Weed
5 grams (1 tsp) simmered in 250 ml (1 pint) of water for 10 to 15 minutes, three times daily
Horny goat weed has been shown to relieve hay fever symptoms.

People with hay fever had better symptomatic relief and reductions in levels of immune cells associated with allergic reactions (eosinophils) when treated with an herbal formula containing horny goat weed compared with a formula without horny goat weed and another herb by itself.10 Traditionally 5 grams (1 tsp) of horny goat weed is taken three times per day, usually after being simmered (decocted) in 250 ml (1 pint) of water for 10 to 15 minutes.11

2 Stars
Probiotics
Refer to label instructions
In one trial, supplementing with Bifidobacterium longum strain BB536 during the pollen season significantly decreased symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, nasal blockage.

In a double-blind trial, supplementation with a specific probiotic strain (Bifidobacterium longum strain BB536) during the pollen season significantly decreased symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, nasal blockage, compared with a placebo.12

2 Stars
Thymus Extracts
120 mg daily purified thymus polypeptides
A thymus extract known as Thymomodulin has been shown in studies to improve the symptoms of hay fever and allergic rhinitis.

The oral administration of a thymus extract known as Thymomodulin has been shown in preliminary studies and double-blind trials to improve the symptoms of hay fever and allergic rhinitis.13 , 14 , 15 Presumably this clinical improvement is the result of restoration of proper control over immune function .

2 Stars
Vitamin E
800 IU daily
In a study of people with hay fever, adding vitamin E to regular anti-allergy treatment during the pollen season significantly reduced the severity of hay fever symptoms.

In a double-blind trial, supplementation with a specific probiotic strain (Bifidobacterium longum strain BB536) during the pollen season significantly decreased symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, nasal blockage, compared with a placebo.16

1 Star
Nettle
0.5 to 8 grams daily
Taking nettle leaf may ease symptoms, including sneezing and itchy eyes.

In an isolated double-blind trial, nettle leaf led to a slight reduction in symptoms of hay fever—including sneezing and itchy eyes.17 However, no other research has investigated this relationship. Despite the lack of adequate scientific support, some doctors suggest taking 450 mg of nettle leaf capsules or tablets two to three times per day, or a 2–4 ml tincture three times per day for people suffering from hay fever.

1 Star
Quercetin
Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
Quercetin is an increasingly popular treatment for hay fever.

Quercetin is an increasingly popular treatment for hay fever even though only limited preliminary clinical research has suggested that it is beneficial to hay fever sufferers.18

1 Star
Sho-seiryu-to (Licorice, Cassia Bark, Schisandra, Ma Huang, Ginger, Peony Root, Pinellia, and Asiasarum Root)
Refer to label instructions
The Japanese herbal formula known as sho-seiryu-to has been shown to reduce symptoms, such as sneezing, for people with hay fever.

The Japanese herbal formula known as sho-seiryu-to has been shown to reduce symptom, such as sneezing, for people with hay fever.19 Sho-seiryu-to contains licorice , cassia bark, schisandra , ma huang, ginger , peony root , pinellia, and asiasarum root.

1 Star
Tylophora
Spray a lotion containing 3.7% citronella in a slow-release formula every morning for six days per week
Tylophora contains compounds that have been reported to interfere with the action of mast cells, which contribute to itchy eyes, runny nose, and chest tightness.

Tylophora is an herb used by Ayurvedic doctors in India to treat people with allergies . It contains compounds that have been reported to interfere with the action of mast cells, which are key components in the process of inflammation responsible for most hay fever symptoms.20 Mast cells are found in airways of the lungs (among other parts of the body). When mast cells are activated by pollen or other allergens, they release the chemical histamine, which in turn leads to a wide number of symptoms familiar to hay fever sufferers—itchy eyes, runny nose, and chest tightness. Ayurvedic doctors sometimes recommend 200–400 mg of the dried herb daily or 1–2 ml of the tincture per day for up to two weeks.

1 Star
Vitamin C
Refer to label instructions
Vitamin C has antihistamine activity, and supplementing with it has been reported to help people with hay fever.

Although vitamin C has antihistamine activity, and supplementation, in preliminary research,21 , 22 has been reported to help people with hay fever, 2,000 mg of vitamin C per day did not reduce hay fever symptoms in a placebo controlled trial.23 Thus, while some doctors recommend that hay fever sufferers take 1,000–3,000 mg of vitamin C per day, supportive evidence remains weak.

References

1. Speer F. Multiple food allergy. Ann Allerg 1975;34:71-6.

2. Buczylko K, Kowalczyk J, Zeman K, et al. Allergy to food in children with pollinosis. Rocz Akad Med Bialymst 1995;40:568-72.

3. Ogle KA, Bullock JD. Children with allergic rhinitis and/or bronchial asthma treated with elimination diet. Ann Allergy 1977;39:8-11.

4. Schapowal A, Petasites Study Group. Randomised controlled trial of butterbur and cetirizine for treating seasonal allergic rhinitis. BMJ 2002;324:144-6.

5. Lee DK, Gray RD, Robb FM, et al. A placebo-controlled evaluation of butterbur and fexofenadine on objective and subjective outcomes in perennial allergic rhinitis. Clin Exp Allergy 2004;34:646-9.

6. Yu YJ. Effect of tian-huang-ling granule in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi 1989;9:720-1, 708 [in Chinese].

7. Chen JK, Chen TT. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry, CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., 2003.

8. Schapowal A; Petasites Study Group. Butterbur Ze339 for the treatment of intermittent allergic rhinitis: dose-dependent efficacy in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2004;130:1381-6.

9. Badar VA, Thawani VR, Wakode PT, et al. Efficacy of Tinospora cordifolia in allergic rhinitis. J Ethnopharmacol 2005;96:445-9.

10. Yu YJ. Effect of tian-huang-ling granule in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Za Zhi 1989;9:720-1, 708 [in Chinese].

11. Chen JK, Chen TT. Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology. City of Industry, CA: Art of Medicine Press, Inc., 2003.

12. Xiao JZ, Kondo S, Yanagisawa N, et al. Probiotics in the treatment of Japanese cedar pollinosis: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Clin Exp Allergy 2006;36:1425-35.

13. Cazzola P, Mazzanti P, Bossi G. In vivo modulating effect of a calf thymus acid lysate on human T lymphocyte subsets and CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the course of different diseases. Curr Ther Res 1987;42:1011-7.

14. Kouttab NM, Prada M, Cazzola P. Thymomodulin: Biological properties and clinical applications. Med Oncol Tumor Pharmacother 1989;6:5-9 [review].

15. Marzari R, Mazzanti P, Cazzola P, Pirodda E. Perennial allergic rhinitis: prevention of the acute episodes with Thymomodulin. Minerva Med 1987;78:1675-81.

16. Xiao JZ, Kondo S, Yanagisawa N, et al. Probiotics in the treatment of Japanese cedar pollinosis: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Clin Exp Allergy 2006;36:1425-35.

17. Mittman P. Randomized double-blind study of freeze-dried Urtica diocia in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Planta Med 1990;56:44-7.

18. Balabolkin II, Gordeeva GF, Fuseva ED, et al. Use of vitamins in allergic illnesses in children. Vopr Med Khim 1992;38:36-40.

19. Baba S, Takasaka T. Double-blind clinical trial of sho-seiryu-to (TJ-19) for perennial nasal allergy. Clin Otolaryngol 1995;88:389-405.

20. Gopalakrishnan C, Shankaranarayan D, Nazimudeen SK, et al. Effect of tylophorine, a major alkaloid of Tylophora indica, on immunopathological and inflammatory reactions. Ind J Med Res 1980;71:940-8.

21. Holmes HM, Alexander W. Hay fever and vitamin C. Science 1942;96:497.

22. Ruskin SL. High dose vitamin C in allergy. Am J Dig Dis 1945;12:281.

23. Fortner BR Jr, Danziger RE, Rabinowitz PS, Nelson HS. The effect of ascorbic acid on cutaneous and nasal response to histamine and allergen. J Allergy Clin Immunol 1982;69:484-8.

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise, Incorporated disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use. How this information was developed to help you make better health decisions.

Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.

© 2014 St. Mary's Health System   |  3700 Washington Avenue  |  Evansville, IN 47750  |  (812) 485-4000