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National Cancer Control Month


The body is made up of hundreds of millions of living cells. Normal body cells grow, divide, and die in an orderly fashion. During the early years of a person's life, normal cells divide faster to allow the person to grow. After the person becomes an adult, most cells divide only to replace worn-out or dying cells or to repair injuries. Cancer begins when cells in a part of the body start to grow out of control. There are many kinds of cancer, but they all start because of out-of-control growth of abnormal cells.

Cancer cell growth is different from normal cell growth. Instead of dying, cancer cells continue to grow and form new, abnormal cells. Cancer cells can also invade (grow into) other tissues, something that normal cells cannot do. Growing out of control and invading other tissues are what makes a cell a cancer cell.

April 2010
Resources: Health Day, Healthwise and American Cancer Society

 

Feature Stories

Bringing cancer under control

For Georgia man, early detection made all the difference

How cancer works

Related Resources

Cancer Learning Center.

American Cancer Society

Prevent Cancer Foundation

CDC Cancer Prevention and Control

National Cancer Institute

 

 

 

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